Panoramic Images, Images and Video ~ Towers of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre ~ Jesus’ Execution, Burial and Resurrection ~ Old City of Jerusalem, Israel ~ Jerusalem 101

Towers of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre ~ Jesus’ Execution, Burial and Resurrection

The Holy Sepulchre Church which is built over the site of Jesus’ execution, burial and resurrection. Southern front of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, old city of Jerusalem, Israel

The Holy Sepulchre Church which is built over the site of Jesus’ execution, burial and resurrection. 360° image click

Entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulcher

The entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. The current building was inaugurated by the Crusaders who rebuilt it in 1149. This site was
honored by first century Christians, buried by Hadrian in 135, identified by local believers in 326, covered by Constantine’s church by 335, which was then
destroyed by the Persians in 614, only to be rebuilt and destroyed again by the Muslim Caliph Hakim in 1009. The right (east) half of the main entrance to the church
was walled shut by the Muslims after the Crusaders lost Jerusalem in 1187.

The “Entrance Court” on the outside of the open door leading into the the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. The “Entrance Court” can be located on the map below:

Floor plan of today’s Church of the Holy Sepulcher. Locate the “Entrance” (right above the “Entrance Court) and the unblocked door seen above.

 

Church of the Holy Sepulchre Jerusalem

 
Exterior of the Church
  360° image

The holiest Christian shrine in the world is situated on the Hill of Golgotha (skull hill), used to be an execution location outside the city walls. According to Christian gospels, and with compatibility to archeological discoveries, this is the real site of Jesus’ crucifixion, burial and resurrection.

The beautiful architecture of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is a combination of Crusader, Byzantine and Greek structures. In addition, five Christian communities share the Church today: the Roman Catholic, the Greek Orthodox, the Armenian, the Coptic and the Syrian Orthodox, each has its own part inside the church.

 
The Holy Sepulchre
360° image  

History:
In 335 AD, Constantin, the Emperor of Byzantium, and his mother, Helena, built a splendid church on the exact site where the massive excavations they ran revealed the tomb of Jesus. The church was completely destroyed by Caliph El-Hakim in 1009, partly reconstructed by the Byzantines in 1042, and entirely rebuilt by the Crusaders when they entered Jerusalem on July 15, 1099.

However, a big fire in 1808 caused a lot of damaged to the church, which had been repaired by the Greek Orthodox during the last century. The architecture of the church as it exists today is therefore a combination of Crusader, Byzantine and Greek structures.

Information:
Visitors of all religions are requested to enter the Church of the Holy Sepulchre modestly dressed. The church is open daily from 5:00am to 9:00pm (4:00am to 8:00pm at wintertime), admission is free. The church can be reached from Jaffa Gate, through the Christian Quarter St., or from the Lions Gate following Jesus’ footsteps along the Via Doloroza.

 

Panoramic

Links: FULL HD Jerusalem;

Western Wall Old City Jerusalem

The Kotel Tunnel Old City Jerusalem

A prayer at the Kotel

Jaffa Gate Old City Jerusalem

Bridge of Strings – Gesher HaMeitarim – Jerusalem

Pedestrian-only Mamilla shopping mall outside Jaffa Gate  

Mahaneh Yehuda Market Jerusalem

Israel Supreme Court – Msupreme Court

Church of Mary Magdalene – Jerusalem, Israel

Church of the Holy Sepulcher

Church of the Holy Sepulcher – Chapel of St Helena

Tower of David – Museum of the History of Jerusalem

Abu Shukri Restaurant Old City Jerusalem One of the most famous Hummus Restaurant in the old city located where the Via Doloroza meets Al Wad Road (63 Hagie Street).

View at the Old City Walls

The Cave of John the Baptist The cave is situated within the orchards of Kibbutz Tzuba, which is near the village of Ein Karem – the traditional birthplace of John the Baptist – west of Jerusalem (Luke 1:39-40).

The Cave of John the Baptist – Entrance The cave is believed to be the place where John the Baptist sought his first solitude in the ‘wilderness’ (Luke 1:80) and where he first practiced his baptism procedures.

The Cave of John the Baptist – Belmont Fort courtyard

Damascus Gate Old City Jerusalem

The Four Quarters of the Old City

The Old City of Jerusalem is divided into four quarters:

1- Jewish Quarter  2- Muslim Quarter  3- Armenian Quarter  4- Christian Quarter

The Muslim Quarter is one of the four quarters of the ancient, walled Old City of Jerusalem, the other three being the Jewish Quarter, the Christian Quarter and the Armenian Quarter.
The Muslim Quarter is the largest and most populous of the four quarters and is situated in the northeastern corner of the Old City, extending from the Lions’ Gate in the east, along the northern wall of the Temple Mount in the south, to the Damascus Gate – Western Wall route in the west.
The Via Dolorosa road starts in the quarter.

Christian Quarter

The Christian Quarter is the most visited quarter of the Old City because it includes the site of Jesus’ death, burial and resurrection—the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. This quarter is full of churches and holy sites whose roofs, domes and facades are built close together.

Church of All Nations

The Church of All Nations , also known as the Church of the Agony or the Basilica of the Agony, is a Roman Catholic church located on Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, next to the Garden of Gethsemane. It enshrines a section of bedrock where Jesus is said to have prayed before the night of his arrest.

Video Introducing the Church of the Holy Sepulcher

 Jerusalem 101

 

Biblical Inspiration 1 ~ GOD IN THE GARDEN – Overhearing His Agony ~ Moody Church

Click

 

 
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The Inspirational
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